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Tag Archives: dialogue

Conversational Writing

Okay, this is something that I get asked about, time and time again.

Conversational Writing

What is it? What’s the difference? There’s a massive difference. I don’t know much about writing novels, I have more knowledge about writing scripts/screenplays…you get the gist. But for even the budding novelists of the world, this is important.

When I first began writing scripts, It was not my plots that got me noticed – it was my dialogue. ‘How do you manage to write like that?’ ‘You have an incredible ear for conversation and dialogue…’

It didn’t mean much to me at the time…my answer would always be that I just write how people speak. It was only when it clicked for me that this doesn’t come so easily for everyone, that I realised it’s true value.

Whatever you a writing – a book or script, your characters will need to talk and interact. I’ve read so many great ideas and stories but for the voices of the characters to fall flat and sound unrealistic.

Realism: That’s the important thing here.

Check out this video. It’s funny and it’s been cut but whilst I was laughing watching, I also noted what a great example it was, in terms of dialogue.

Imagine this exchange as a script – this conversation written down. The characters would interrupt each other; there would be half finished sentences. The exchanges are short and snappy…real people don’t burst into long monologues, when chatting!

It really is some great advice for any Writer – to listen and observe the interaction and conversation styles of everyday people. It really is vital, in order to really achieve that gritty exchange on the page.

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I Don’t Like Chat Up Lines.

“Get your coat, you’ve pulled.”

Pulled what?”

“You know what I mean.”

“Do you?”

“What?”

“Know what you mean.”

“Erm. Yeah.”

“You don’t sound so sure.”

“Oh, I’m sure, alright.”

“So I get my coat. What then?”

“We could go to my place. Or yours. I don’t mind, I;/”

“What then?”

“What?”

“What then? Once I am at your place. Or mine.”

“We could get naughty.”

“What do you class as naughty?”

“You know.”

“Do you?”

“Jesus!”

“Where?”

“Stop mucking me about.”

“Why am I?”

“Because you know exactly what;/”

“But I want to know if you do.”

“What?”

“Know.”

“Know what!”

“You know…”

“No I don’t know!”

“You don’t?”

“NO!”

“Didn’t think so.”

“So…?”

“Now we know.”

“Is that a no?”

“Yes.”